Return to Beaune

May 22, 2019

Because today was a market day and because most everything was closed when we were there on Monday, and because it’s very close-by, Suzanne and I decided to drive back to Beaune for a re-do.

We found parking right away, very near the center. We started out walking the wrong direction, but were quickly straightened out by a friendly English speaking passerby.

Even though we’ve been to several markets, it’s always fun to look at all the vibrant food and French wares on display. This market had several linen and spice vendors, plus a truffle stall.

They had black and white truffles, whole, in salt, pieces and paste. Since we are so close to Dijon, there were plenty of mustards offered too.

Once we’d finished ogling everything in the little market, we started off to the Musée des Beaux Arts. On our way we passed through a little alley that had this appealing garden with two statues.

The museum was fairly small, but had some very fine paintings, most by local artists, but they had one Rubens.

Two of the artists that were born in Beaune, were Hippolyte Michaud and Felix Ziem.

This is a Hippolyte Michaud painting. The actual canvas was probably 4′ x 6′.

Velours who was a Flemish painter, called these paintings, The Allegory of the Four Elements.

Ziem was a painter of the Barbizon school. The Barbizon school was active from 1830-1870. The most prominent features of this school were tonal qualities, color, loose brushwork and softness of form*.

After the museum we were ready for a little window shopping. Loved this shop with their pig display. They appeared to sell all things pork, including the artful pates in the window.

Suzanne was thinking about some items she saw in a shop window on Monday. So we hiked around until we found the shop. While Suzanne was looking at the wares, I was admiring the resident geriatric dog and his princely bed.

They have pretty wild glasses frames here. We enjoyed looking at some of the more flamboyant examples.

And of course the sweet shops called to us. We succumbed to 1/2 dozen cookies and some more chocolate covered almonds.

Our two hour parking spot was out of time, so we went to move the car to a new spot. One of the things I like about parking here is that if there is a spot open across the street and you can quickly get into it, it’s perfectly legal. Driving is fairly straightforward here with no U turns in the intersections or middle of the block. Driver’s generally are fast, but mostly courteous, of course there are exceptions.

On our way back to the center we saw a sign for the Wine Museum, we had to go. The museum consisted mostly of huge old grape presses with different methods of applying pressure. The press below (featured photo) used a rope system, that was wound on the spindle to the right, lowering the press into the grapes.

I couldn’t figure out how this ginormous press worked. I’ll let you work it out. Hint, it has to do with the wooden screw to the right, that’s as far as I got. Yes, genius I know….

Famished from our exploration, we went back to the restaurant Les Chebaliers for some Rose Champagne, soup, fish and chips and apple tart. Very good food and we’ve had our big meal of the day.

Back to the car for the trip home. We didn’t have Babette programmed immediately, so I just followed signs and we got a lovely drive through the village of Pommard and the vineyards all the way home. Au revoir…

*art history, Wikipedia

2 thoughts on “Return to Beaune

  1. So glad that you went back to Beaune. Is that pronounced like ‘bone’? Such marvelous food for the tummy and the eyes. The art is reminding me to get back to the Portland Art Museum. Bonjour et Bonne Nuit.

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